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Where food is concerned, there is no limit to the quest for the right product or a better understanding of elementary physiological mechanisms. What is the ideal shape for a bar of chocolate? How do hunger hormones work? Find the answers here!

6 articles
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16.04.2015 Ian Horman BSc, PhD.
Our digestive system is like a biochemical factory. The pancreas sends enzymes to the mouth, the stomach and the gastrointestinal tract to break down the foods we eat and liberate their nutrients which will in turn feed our bodies and brains. Unused food residues leave our body via the colon as faeces.
5 min. Be the first to leave a comment
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09.04.2015 Colin Rogers
What is it exactly that makes us feel hungry? And what are the mechanisms that tell us we’ve eaten enough? Science has taken huge strides forward in understanding the processes that maintain a healthy balance between food intake and energy expenditure … and what to do when things go wrong.
3 min. Be the first to leave a comment
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27.04.2014 Christoph Hartmann
It’s a scientific fact: a chocolate bar needs to have just the right shape for the flavour to be optimally released.
5 min. Be the first to leave a comment
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25.03.2014 Patrizia Coggiola
A Finnish chef and a Spanish designer have created a kitchen that runs exclusively on solar power, even in Alaska. The dishes taste slightly different each time they’re prepared. But what if it’s cloudy or raining out?
4 min. Be the first to leave a comment
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29.01.2014 Chrystel Loret

Children who chew properly are able to taste food better and enjoy it more. When the elderly lose this ability, they take less pleasure in eating.

5 min. Be the first to leave a comment
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29.01.2014 Martin Michel

In 2007 artificial colourings needed to be replaced by natural ones, but there was no natural dye for blue. When children protested loudly, researchers found the solution in a special type of algae.

5 min. Be the first to leave a comment
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